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Jul 23, 2014 | 03:02 PM CDT

Study: Believing Odor is Harmful Can Create Asthmatic Inflammation

New research shows that believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure.

Jun 02, 2014 | 09:39 AM CDT

Study: Pleasant Smells Increase Facial Attractiveness

Women’s faces were rated as more attractive in the presence of pleasant odors; odor pleasantness had less effect on the evaluation of age.

Apr 04, 2014 | 03:22 PM CDT

Study: Body Odor Changes Following Vaccination

A study reveals the first demonstration of a bodily odor change due to immune activation.

Mar 03, 2014 | 09:54 AM CST

Report Shows Aromatic Chemicals Limit Global Warming

The study reviewed the oxidation of VOCs, in particular the terpene α-pinene, under atmospherically relevant conditions in chamber experiments.

Feb 17, 2014 | 11:49 AM CST

Study Identifies Receptors Connecting Smell to Appetite When Fasting

A study has found that cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors in the brain promote food intake in mice subjected to fasting and hunger by increasing odor detection.

Feb 17, 2014 | 11:19 AM CST

Monell: Odor-Producing Chemicals in Earwax Differ Among Ethnicities

Scientists from the Monell Center have used analytical organic chemistry to identify the presence of odor-producing chemical compounds in human earwax.

Jan 06, 2014 | 10:39 AM CST

Study Reveals Odors Are Expressible in Language

A recent study noted the long-held assumption that people are bad at naming smells is not universally true. Odors are expressible in language, as long as you speak the right language.

Dec 09, 2013 | 09:44 AM CST

Study Finds Extensive Variability in Olfactory Receptors

Monell researchers have found that as much as 30 percent of the large array of human olfactory receptor differs between any two individuals.

Nov 14, 2013 | 12:59 PM CST

Researcher Develops Hydroperoxide Detection Method for Fragrance Allergens

Research from the University of Gothenburg has led to a potential method for identifying allergenic fragrance compounds in consumer products by exposing them to air.