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Natural Vanillin Obtained by Means of Bioconversion

By: Corine Cochennec
Posted: July 29, 2013, from the August 2013 issue of P&F magazine.

Vanilla has traditionally been, and will certainly remain, one of the most widely appreciated flavors in the world, reminiscent of wholesomeness, tenderness and comfort of childhood, while remaining a very trendy flavor.

Vanillin naturally occurs in levels up to 2% of the dry matter of cured vanilla beans (F-1); vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is the main organoleptic characteristic aroma component.

Vanillin naturally occurs in levels up to 2% of the dry matter of cured vanilla beans (F-1); vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is the main organoleptic characteristic aroma component.

The large demand for vanilla in sweet flavors cannot be met by the available volume of cultivated vanilla beans alone. In order to satisfy increasing global demand, ingredient suppliers have developed ways to produce natural vanillin identical to the one present in vanilla beans.

This is only an excerpt of the full article that appeared in P&F Magazine. The full content is not currently available online.